Posts Tagged ‘aviation’

Honda Cross runner

Honda prepared the actual Cross runner round the devoted 782cc, 90-degree V4 motor through the VFR 800 Interceptor released within 2002. Large Red-colored additionally elected to make use of which sport bike’s framework, that is of the actually old vintage-the twin-spar light weight aluminum framework as well as single-sided swing arm tend to be small transformed through the ones from the actual ’98-model VFR. The actual Cross runner additionally utilizes this bike’s ABS-equipped tires as well as delay, pause.

The actual quad-cam, 16-valve V4 is actually in house the same, however Honda extended the actual consumption trumpets as well as modified the actual wear out to enhance bottom-end torque. The actual VTEC variable-valve program continues to be retuned to slice within slowly among 6600 as well as 6800 revoltions per minute, instead of suddenly in the greater number because prior to. In this way much more energy among three thousand as well as 6000 revoltions per minute, however somewhat much less drive among 6500 as well as 10,000 revoltions per minute.

Bodywork is brand new, obviously. The goal was going to develop a kind of two-wheeled SUV, along with a minimum of the notional capability upon somewhat tough areas; therefore the actual a more elevated appear. However Honda did not need bicycle that just high individuals might trip, therefore the slimmer chair helps maintain the actual rider’s perched to some affordable thirty-two. one ins. The actual traveling place is nearly bolt-upright, searching over the electronic device screen distributed to the brand new CBR600F.

The actual ‘Runner dealt with all those ultra-nadgery highways fairly nicely, even though many times I discovered personally asking yourself just how much much better it might happen to be in case Honda experienced used the problem to build up the lighter in weight, hotter framework. Guiding geometry as well as delay, pause really are a bargain. Increasing the actual bike’s tail whilst to get rake the same improved path, that was possibly the reason why the actual bicycle required a strong nudge upon the handle bars to obtain this into a good flex. And when the street stiffened upward suddenly, this required an additional mindful enter to modify the collection.

A new chassis would have helped make the ride even quicker and more entertaining. But if Honda had spent more time and money on development and high-tech parts, it wouldn’t be able to sell the Cross runner for such a competitive price. It’s roughly 10 percent less expensive than the VFR in Europe, so it’s not bad value for a versatile, reasonably practical bike that delivers its design team’s aim of easy fun. Shame American riders won’t get the chance to discover that for themselves-at least not this year.

Yamaha Star Power

Yamaha, long the most cruiser-conscious Asian motorcycle maker, has rebranded its cruiser line as Star Motorcycles. Yamaha was the first Japanese manufacturer with a real line of cruisers, rolling out its Special series in the late 1970s. It built the first modern Japanese tandem V-twin in ’81 with the Virago 750 the first bike carrying a Japanese engine built specifically for the cruiser market. In ’96, Yamaha raised the bar again with its Star-series motorcycles, which brought classic style, high-end finishes, appropriate technology and easy personalization to the mix. The Star series has been extremely successful (and profitable) and has attracted solid aftermarket support and tremendous customer enthusiasm.


Powered by a 1854cc air-cooled V-twin, the Star Roadliner has an aluminum frame wrapped in elegant, eye-pleasing lines inspired by the streamliner styling of the ’30s. The streamliner era of styling was prompted by the first aerodynamic advances back in the ’20s and ’30s. It inspired the designs of everything from trains to toasters and delivered some of the prettiest automobiles in memory. That theme echoes through the Roadliner’s sweeping fenders and flow-through lines.

The eight-valve pushrod engine shares the same 48-degree V angle of the Road Star series, but has a 100mm bore and 118mm stroke (compared with 97 x 113mm for the 1670cc engine), moves the transmission mainshaft 5mm farther from the crankshaft and inhales through dual fuel-injector throats. An EXUP valve, a cruiser first, increases the efficiency of the 2-into-1 exhaust, and a big oil-cooler keeps the fluids temperate.

Buyers will have three versions to choose from when the Roadliner hits showrooms this fall, with the base model retailing for just under $14,000. As with other Star Motorcycles, there will be a blacked-out Midnight version of the Roadliner for about $1000 more. Topping the series will be the Roadliner S (expected to have an MSRP under $16,000), which will feature additional chrome and polish throughout.